Time Traveler 2.0

by Bruce Kramer on Tue, 2014-03-11 14:44

Editor's note: The word disease is written dis ease by Bruce Kramer in all of his blogs, which coincides with the title of his blog, Dis Ease Diary.

Bruce Kramer, Ph.D.

This weekend, Ev and I watched the movie "About Time." The plot is built around the idea that men in a certain family can travel back in time to fix things that they may have bollixed up the first time round. This premise is used to good advantage for the sake of comedy and poignancy, offering humor, a few tears and mostly enjoyment. It isn’t the greatest movie I have ever seen, but we had fun watching it. And there was another reason that I enjoyed the movie besides fun with Ev. You see, I am intimately acquainted with time travel, for time travel is one of the great gifts given by dis ease.

It is a gift not to be taken lightly.

Imagine my surprise in the first year of my rebirth in ALS to discover that I could travel through time. Up until the very moment of my diagnosis, I’d always thought that time travel was impossible, that time was sequential and had to be experienced minute to minute, hour to hour, day to day. Einstein notwithstanding, it was my deeply held, almost sacred belief that once you have left, you can never go back, an entire life built on the idea that going back was impossible. And then came my diagnosis, and I realized that at some point not only could I go back, but that I would.

Since that time, I have spent a great number of hours traveling in time. You might call it remembering, but it is more intense than memory. Here is how it works. I close my eyes, think of something that brings me back to the desired time — a smell or sight, a sound or feeling for example — and then with a flutter of breath and eyes turned inward toward the space between wakefulness and twilight, I am back, reliving the desired experience as if it was happening for the first time. Only this time, because I know what is coming, I am able to pay better attention to things I might have missed. For example, in the births of my two sons, I had missed vital details, small but significant.

When David was born, it was summer, with the sun streaming through the window of the hospital room, tendrils of comfort and grace in spite of our exhaustion and Ev’s pain. When I travel to that moment, I feel sunlight’s warmth on my back as Ev dozes in and out of worried sleep. We were so inexperienced, but I reassure her, I know how it ends and everything will be wonderful.

When Jon was born, we walked up and down our Stavanger, Norway street, oblivious to the cold and Christmas day’s weak sunlight. I drink in the moment that as a contraction squeezes through my Ev, she puts her hands just so around my neck waiting for the pain to pass. There is nothing like the flutter and strength of her hand, and her eye catches mine with mutual strength and reassurance. I love revisiting the days our sons were born. The anticipation is delicious, the potential unfathomable, and their births are a joyful energy released into the universe over and over again.

You cannot tell me that this is not time travel.

There are significant consequences if you do not travel in time. Suppose you are duped into thinking that you can never go back, then you believe that life should be constructed with no regrets, no sorrow for what you might have done, no question about the direction you have taken. The psyche is constructed to learn and grow from mistakes, and if you see no future application of past regret, then you deny the regrets that have made you. You state to others that your life is exactly as it should be, and that all past experiences were necessary for the life that is. You wave a flag that says you regret nothing. You repress any sorrow for what you might have done but didn’t. You feel an overwhelming need to believe that you cannot go back, because if you acknowledge that you could, then regret and sorrow and questioning could not be so easily disposed.

I know this firsthand.

For such a long time in my life, before my rebirth in ALS, I tried to hold a “no regrets” philosophy for living. As seductive as the lie of curing disease, no regrets is a lie of arrogance and limitation. Since my rebirth, I have taken untold opportunities to time travel, to go back, sometimes just to experience it all again, and other times to seek what I might have done, what I should have done, what I wished I would’ve done. This has resulted in a sense of the present not defined by day or date or time, but by place — the grounding of my life energy beyond my feet and into the earth, above my head and into the heavens. Of course, I cannot time travel to what I have not yet experienced. I know that I cannot look into the future except to experience its implications from my past.

I have been granted the grace of regret and growth.

My greatest regret since my diagnosis was the diagnosis event itself. I allowed a situation to take place that was harmful to the people I love the most. It took me three years to figure out the post-traumatic stress of this event, but I did, and once I did I knew I had to go back. This would be a different type of time travel, one that existed in the present and not in the energy between wakefulness and twilight. It would require every ounce of leadership skill, educative energy and dis ease learning that I could muster. It would require that I go back with no expectations of the neurologist who rendered my diagnosis and total expectation of myself who received.

So I made an appointment and met with the neurologist.

I met with him to make the case in every way I knew for a more humane, a more sensitive, a more holy and human act than what I had experienced. I met with him to say what I regretted not saying, that how one reads the script might be more important than the script. I met with him to help him see that great privilege granted in a life-changing moment requires far more creativity and imagination than is available in a strict yet blind reading of a perceived protocol. I met with him, and the result was predictable — he was defensive, and I pressed the advantages of ALS. Yet in the end, I hope that by meeting with him, he will hear my voice the next time and the next that the holy experience of diagnosis is presented. And I know that by meeting with him, I am better now.

The circle for me has been closed, and time travel even in the present has realized its potential.

Clearly, I am not a movie critic, but I recommend "About Time," especially if you can watch it with someone whose company you enjoy. I am not sure if I’m qualified as a life critic except I know that three years of ALS reveal challenges and gifts totally unlooked for. Time travel can heal regret and sorrow and questions of purpose or decision. It will not cure you of the first-time wounds, but it will offer you healing the next time around, even if the first time was really bollixed up. You might experience one of the most blessed and graced periods of your life. You might learn to time travel even in the present.

And if you are really lucky, you can stroll a street, feel sunlight, and know unfathomable energy released into the universe over and over and over again.

This blog was posted originally on Feb. 17, 2014.

About the Author

Bruce Kramer, Ph.D., was diagnosed with ALS in December 2010. An educator for his entire life, he served as the dean of the College of Education, Leadership and Counseling at the University of St. Thomas in Saint Paul, Minn., until October 2012. Since March 2011, he has written the Dis Ease Diary, reflections on living and dying with ALS, and is featured in Minnesota Public Radio’s Living with ALS series. Kramer is married to Evelyn Emerson, a teacher, and he has two sons, two “daughters-in-love,” and a grandchild on the way.

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